Making a Will

If you die without making a Will the people who administer your estate (“personal representatives”) and the persons who benefit from your estate (beneficiaries) will be determined, as will the amount such beneficiaries receive, by the Administration of Estates Act 1925.  A surviving spouse with children may not get the entirety of their deceased spouse’s estate.  Avoid such risks by making a Will.  That way you can ensure your property goes where you want it to go and matters are dealt with by those you appoint.

Lasting Powers of Attorney

Unfortunately ageing is inevitable and the sudden onset of mental incapacity is a risk we all face.  We, therefore, recommend that all our clients should consider making Lasting Powers of Attorney, as they can prove invaluable to the individual and their families.

When someone makes a Lasting Power of Attorney (Financial Affairs) it allows the person or persons appointed to assist with financial and property matters, or take over the conduct of them when the ability to manage those matters is lost.

A Lasting Power of Attorney (Welfare) permits the appointment of someone, typically a close relative, to make decisions about someone’s care and welfare if they lose the capacity to make such decisions for themselves.

If you are thinking about making a Will or a Lasting Power of Attorney we are happy to help, our receptionist will ask one of our specialist members of staff to speak to you.  Simply call, write or email:

20 West Street

Faversham

Kent

ME13 7JF

 01795 533337

 law@tassells-solicitors.co.uk

Tassells Solicitors Solicitors For The Elderly